Toyota Of Dallas Used Cars, Why Toyota sees fuel cells, hydrogen-powered cars as key path to future

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Toyota Of Dallas Used Cars – When Yoshikazu Tanaka pressed down on the gas pedal, the blue sedan responded, turning past neat houses and shops, in lush, green hills and down into the lines of cars that snaked from traffic lights. The sun was shining, a gentle breeze ruffled the leaves in the trees. The only thing missing is the roar of the engine.

Maybe it was a quiet experience, said Tanaka, chief engineer of the car, when he walked the streets in his hometown, but he said he would try his best to make it fun. “We want to make it fun to drive,” he said. The car is hydrogen-driven Mirai, similar to a quiet semi truck that just stopped at Toyota headquarters in North America in Plano. You will not see one of them on the road in Texas anytime soon.

Toyota Of Dallas Used Cars

However, Toyota hopes that Mirai will specifically help make the zero-emission technology that controls it more everywhere. Like, the Prius is everywhere.

Hydrogen-powered vehicles are one of the ways Toyota – one of the biggest companies in Plano – is trying to disrupt the automotive industry because it faces an uncertain future.

“The reason we chose sedans as fuel cell vehicles … is that they should not only be friendly to the environment,” Tanaka said in an interview, “but for people to really enjoy the benefits of technology, vehicles must be happy driving. ”

Toyota executives and experts have praised the possibility of a hydrogen-fueled future, where vehicles leave little water, do not damage emissions, and recharge does not involve putting the car into the charger for hours at a time. Instead, they use hydrogen fuel, which can be obtained by the driver at a special gas station.

That is the main difference between hydrogen fuel cell cars and pure electric vehicles, such as Teslas.

Skeptics ignore most hydrogen fuel cells as a technological aberration – pausing for a long time on the road to a sustainable future. Controversial Tesla founder Elon Musk has violently destroyed hydrogen, called fuel cells, “stupid cells,” and “very stupid.”

However, Musk’s dislike, Toyota officials say hydrogen has an important role to play in a broader effort to make cars efficient anywhere in the world – not just the US.

While electric plug-in vehicles may seem like a clear choice for most developed countries, physical fuel can be a better choice for places where the electricity network is less reliable.

By 2025, Toyota hopes to have a kind of electrification version of all its cars – which can include electric plug-in vehicles, hybrids or fuel cell vehicles. By 2030, plans for more than half of the cars will be electrified.

Part of that depends on Toyota’s ability to increase the hydrogen fuel cell production it uses in Mirais.

Taiyo Kawai, who heads Toyota’s hydrogen fuel cell development, says manufacturers like Toyota don’t have much experience making things involving complex chemicals such as fuel cell stacks.

“This is a big challenge for vehicle manufacturing companies to produce high-speed and high-volume chemical products,” he said.

This difficulty is exacerbated, said Kawai, with an urge to increase the density of the fuel cell that can be stored because it means they need less expensive raw materials, which in turn makes fuel cells cheaper. If the power density is higher, the fuel cell also does not take up much space in the vehicle.

Then, Mirais himself was made by hand on a neat assembly line at the Toyota City Motomachi factory.

Gloved workers in t-shirts who said, “Zero Emission Challenge 2050,” guided the hydrogen fuel tank into place from under the car. Each car requires one hour to make it from one end to the other, which means a team of 29 total workers complete at most nine cars a day and around 3,000 a year.

In 2020, Kawai said Toyota hopes to increase that number to 30,000 per year.

That compares with the nearby Tsutsumi plant, where assembly lines each year produce 370,000 cars, including the Camrys and Prius.

However, the biggest obstacle to wider adoption has nothing to do with technology or manufacturing. It has to do with infrastructure.

However, the biggest obstacle to wider adoption has nothing to do with technology or manufacturing. It has to do with infrastructure.

There is no hydrogen refueling station in Texas. Even in California, where there is a desire among rich drivers to be on the cutting edge, there are only 35 places to refuel with hydrogen. 29 others are under construction.

“I can’t say that Mirai is cold enough,” Tanaka said, “but vehicles must be attractive so that more people will want to drive them, and more people will say they have to build hydrogen stations.”

For his part, Tanaka said with a smile, he liked the sound of the engine and the sense of guiding sports cars on mountainous winding roads – his favorites included the Lexus LC 500 and Toyota 86. The latter was also favored by bosses, Toyota President Akio Toyoda. For Mirai, something that replicates that feeling is its purpose.

However, environmentalists say they are driven by Toyota’s vocal confidence in hydrogen.

While Honda launched the Clarity sedan fuel cell back in 2008 – long before 2014, when Mirai was first introduced – experts say Toyota’s ability to technology to the mainstream is unmatched.

“Even if Honda or a small company has plowed land, Toyota can commercialize and push it forward, and it knows where the market is,” said Terry Tamminen, CEO of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and head of California’s environmental protection agency under former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Hydrogen fuel cell technology is less valued compared to electric batteries, Tamminen said. Mostly, he said, it was because it was more difficult to store electricity efficiently.

“I think the future of electricity transportation will be hydrogen,” he said. “I think in 10 years we will look back at the battery era as we see a steam engine – it was a good idea at the time but in the end it was not the technology that applies.”

Earlier this year, Toyota’s second version of the hydrogen fuel cell inhibitor stopped at Lone Star State on its way from Michigan, where it was built using two Mirai fuel cell stacks, to California where it was set up for use in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach .

“I can’t say that Mirai is cold enough,” Tanaka said, “but vehicles must be attractive so that more people will want to drive them, and more people will say they have to build hydrogen stations.”

For his part, Tanaka said with a smile, he liked the sound of the engine and the sense of guiding sports cars on mountainous winding roads – his favorites included the Lexus LC 500 and Toyota 86. The latter was also favored by bosses, Toyota President Akio Toyoda. For Mirai, something that replicates that feeling is its purpose.

However, environmentalists say they are driven by Toyota’s vocal confidence in hydrogen.

While Honda launched the Clarity sedan fuel cell back in 2008 – long before 2014, when Mirai was first introduced – experts say Toyota’s ability to technology to the mainstream is unmatched.

“Even if Honda or a small company has plowed land, Toyota can commercialize and push it forward, and it knows where the market is,” said Terry Tamminen, CEO of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and head of California’s environmental protection agency under former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Hydrogen fuel cell technology is less valued compared to electric batteries, Tamminen said. Mostly, he said, it was because it was more difficult to store electricity efficiently.

“I think the future of electricity transportation will be hydrogen,” he said. “I think in 10 years we will look back at the battery era as we see a steam engine – it was a good idea at the time but in the end it was not the technology that applies.”

Earlier this year, Toyota’s second version of the hydrogen fuel cell inhibitor stopped at Lone Star State on its way from Michigan, where it was built using two Mirai fuel cell stacks, to California where it was set up for use in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach .

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