Used Car Lots In Omaha Ne, Playing with cars — Lincoln dealer sells lifetime collection of antique autos, pedal power and toys

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Used Car Lots In Omaha Ne – From his wheelchair in a warehouse on the edge of Lincoln, 94-year-old Ron Doan pointed to the collection he spent all his life pursuing. The collection, which will be distributed at the auction next weekend, empties this building. It was the oldest car, he said, Reo 1906. He bought it in 1947 from L.L. Coryell, a real estate king who runs a royal filling station from Lincoln.

It was Citroen Traction Avant, the model he wanted since he was 13 years old. This one was sold only in Switzerland in 1951, explored the world and landed in Vancouver, Washington, where Doan discovered it about 10 years ago. It was a horse-drawn carriage that he bought for $ 15 when he approached Shirley, transporting him home from Otoe County on the Studebaker. And that was the 1975 Oldsmobile Delta Royale convertible he gave decades later. Not 40,000 miles above it.

Used Car Lots In Omaha Ne

He paused from the story. He wanted to be clear about these cars, that he bought them to drive them. He would not hesitate to pull one from the warehouse, run it around the city, get pleasure behind the wheel.

“I pushed them a little,” he said. “I am not out chasing an event cup.”

He once owned around 50 antique and rare cars, but he had a dozen or more. Older car dealers also have Swaddle Herman’s pedal cars, and the remnants of that business – about 60 children’s cars, from pedal-of-the-20th-century Gendron to gas-fired junior Jaguar – ready to be auctioned off, too .

Likewise the cut and section boxes, dozens of antique toy cars, almost every piece of steel and rubber that defines 90 years of love for the wheel.

But he didn’t break up about that. He can’t enjoy them as he used to at his age, he said. Time for others.

“The business person in me thinks of things like this is a shop, and you will sell it full. Does that make you sad? ”

As a child, his son Houston began to get used to going home and finding something new on their home page. Then, he will spend almost 20 years working with his father at Doan-Rose Auto Sales near Jalan 21 and O.

The cars mean something to his father. But so is the story behind them. It will still be there, even after the warehouse is empty.

“The big thing that most people miss about my father is that even though he has a love and great interest in all types of motorized vehicles, he is a trader,” Houston said. “And for him, that is a calculated pursuit. This is a game that always makes it successful. ”

Careers with cars
Ron Doan’s enthusiasm started early, almost 90 years ago.

“I remember in kindergarten, other children drawing pictures of Mother and Father and home. I drew a car. ”

He returned from military service to work as a display director at the Gold department store, which was responsible for 39 storefronts and half a dozen retail floors.

He stays busy. Scenes change every week – even though they don’t decorate for Christmas until the day after Thanksgiving.

That’s a good job, he said. “But what I really want to do is play with a car.”

He and Ted Rose opened their place in 1949 on the eastern edge of the city center. They sell used cars, but then they find a way to sell new ones, too: If a Buick Lincoln dealer sells from a popular model, for example, Doan will hit the road for many small town Buicks. He paid sticker prices for new cars and parked them in their parking lot in Lincoln.

It’s legal and profitable. They may not get a lot of sales of new cars, but they can make more sell buyer trades. And Doan can build his collection.

“If a car comes in a trade that interests me, I often buy it and save it.”

They became the new car dealers themselves in 1968, selling Datsuns. They added Volvo two years later. The time is good, right before the gas crisis. But some of the initial reactions to their Datsun line were very rough.

“There are people who will come and say bad things, just because they are Japanese cars,” Doan said.

They sold dealers in the late 80s, giving Doan more time to collect and recover pedal cars, and to build new businesses.

From his wheelchair in a warehouse on the edge of Lincoln, Ron Doan, 94, points to the collection he spent all his life pursuing.

The collection, which will be distributed at a weekend auction, empties the building.

It was the oldest car, he said, Reo 1906. He bought it in 1947 from L.L. Coryell, a real estate king who runs a royal filling station from Lincoln.

It was Citroen Traction Avant, the model he wanted since he was 13 years old. This one was only sold in Switzerland in 1951, explored the world and landed in Vancouver, Washington, where Doan discovered it about 10 years ago.

It was the horse-drawn carriage he bought for $ 15 when he approached Shirley, took him home from Otoe County in Studebaker. And that was the 1975 Oldsmobile Delta Royale convertible that he gave decades later. Not 40,000 miles above it.

He stopped from the story. He wanted to be clear about these cars, that he bought them to drive them. He would not hesitate to pull it from the warehouse, run it around the city, get fun behind the wheel.

“I pushed them a little,” he said. “I’m not going out to catch up.”

He once owned around 50 antique and rare cars, but he had a dozen or more. Older car dealers also have Herman Swaddle pedal cars, and the remnants of that business – around 60 children’s cars, ranging from the pedal-of-the-the-century Gendron to gas-fired junior Jaguar – ready to auctioned too.

Likewise with pieces and box sections, dozens of antique toy cars, almost every part of steel and rubber that defines 90 years of love for wheels.

But he didn’t break up about that. He can’t enjoy them as he used to at his age, he said. Time for others.

“The business person in me thinks of things like this is a shop, and you will sell them full. Does that make you sad?”

As a child, his son Houston began to get used to going home and finding something new on their home page. Then, he will spend almost 20 years working with his father in Doan-Rose Auto Sales near Jalan 21 and O.

The cars mean something to his father. But that’s the story behind them. It will still be there, even after the warehouse is empty.

“The big thing that most people miss about my father is that even though he has a love and great interest in all types of motorized vehicles, he is a trader,” Houston said. “And for him, it’s a calculated pursuit. This is a game that always makes it successful.”

Careers with cars
Ron Doan’s enthusiasm started early, almost 90 years ago.

“I remember in kindergarten, other children drawing photos of Mother and Father and home. I drew a car.”

He returned from military service to work as a display director at the Gold department store, which was responsible for 39 storefronts and half a dozen retail floors.

He stays busy. Scenes change every week – even though they don’t decorate for Christmas until the day after Thanksgiving.

That’s a good job, he said. “But what I really want to do is play with a car.”

He and Ted Rose opened their place in 1949 on the eastern edge of the city center. They sell used cars, but then they find a way to sell new ones too: If a Buick Lincoln dealer sells from a popular model, for example, Doan will hit the road for many small towns of Buick. He paid sticker prices for new cars and parked them in their parking lot in Lincoln.

This is legal and profitable. They may not get a lot of sales of new cars, but they can make more sell buyer trades. And Doan can build his collection.

“If a car comes in a trade that interests me, I often buy it and save it.”

They became the new car dealers themselves in 1968, selling Datsuns. They added Volvo two years later. The time is good, right before the gas crisis. But some of the initial reactions to their Datsun line were very rough.

“There are people who will come and say bad things, just because they are Japanese cars,” Doan said.

They sold dealers in the late 80s, giving Doan more time to collect and recover pedal cars, and to build new businesses.

He decided to sell everything earlier this year. That has to do with 94, he said.

“It’s clear I won’t be able to drive them or play with them.”

They hired auctioneer Yvette VanDerBrink from South Dakota. He was known in Nebraska five years ago, when he sold 400 Lambrecht Chevrolet car collections on national TV in a farm near Pierce.

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