Used Cars In Covington La, A safe harbor for blacks during segregation, Anderson’s East Church Street rich in history

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Used Cars In Covington La, A safe harbor for blacks during segregation, Anderson’s East Church Street rich in history – Stewart Anderson was one of Anderson’s most famous businessmen you probably did not hear.

Stewart, a farmer who has no formal education, has built up a successful job as a trader who usually moves his products from a small space on West Reed Street in his 110 East Church caretaker shop. He also produced fruits and vegetables on his farm. 1900-1924, sold under the conserved Hickory Spring Brand and selling eyeglasses at the store and other stores.

Anderson, whose land in Gwendolyn Anderson, “Anderson Circuit Board Profiles”, was part of the 20th Century Energy of East Church Street, where color educators, however, moved on with limited financial resources.

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It was a work that was born of the bitter cult race, but a special place in Anderson’s story and in the hearts of those who remember it.

More than half of the twentieth century, East Church Street was the city’s city where a festive atmosphere often inspires the community’s pride in walking distance from Main Street. During the separation period it was a black community’s asylum.

“When I was a kid, I grew up in Townville, it was the city’s weekend,” said Beaumont, a member of the City Council, Anderson, who visited Street School Reed a few miles away. Kilometers, black students in the 50s and 60s.

But in church village Thompson saw black families in restaurants, shops and beauty salons. “It was an escape for a black community … could go there and be treated with respect and dignity.”

An atmosphere with barbecue and beer scent, jazz sound and later motor music, will also make your vacation a refuge.

“My parents have clearly shown that I can not work without adults,” recalls Thompson last week, “why did you want to continue in the village?”

Memories differ when Anderson’s black business circle reaches its peak. Some say that the city records in the thirties of the last century showed at least 30 companies in the area at a height of depression.

Their chain stores, hairdressers, billiards rooms and restaurants and their friendships were delighted by young black schoolchildren.

Ideal Café, Ideal Pharmacy and Ideal Hotel are located in the year 1930, near the main street junction with four hotel rooms. Johnson’s supermarket was within walking distance between Henry Valentino’s shoe store and George Groves’s printing and processing company. Haskells Wardlaw was in 113 East Church; Brissey’s Blacksmith, Arthur Lee Workshop and Anderson’s cars were at the eastern end, closer to McDuffie Street.

Across the street three hospital offices were Funeral home Willis Ignatius (W.I.) Peek. Guests come to the Lee Davis Store, the Ritz Theater and the Southern Candy Jackson Building, the Vandiver Beauty Hotel, Nannie and Sylvere Blassingam, Jackson’s Furniture, Leonara Wilson Guest House and a few small rooms. .

Five hairdressers flourished at different times over 70 years. There were altogether 11 beauty salons, six hotels, four cemeteries, four doctors, five dentists, ten taxis, three general stores, two crowns, two theaters, two pharmacies, two liquor stores and taverns.

Edmond Johnson, who had healed patients in 110 East Church Street since 1914 until he died in 1946, was one of the first doctors who received recognition from a well-known businessman George Johnson Bail. inspiration, truth and sincerity “.

Johnson’s working time was directed to the working class. It was usually open until 20:00.

Above all, the front door of the Peoples Barber Shop was remembered that brothers Thomas and Richard Davis were in the East Church from 1920 to 1971. “I was worried because I did not have any shoes.”

The most famous entrepreneurs are Peek, a georgian who graduated from the Tuskeegee Institute, opened in 1919 a ferry and stores and other shops including coffee, a tea room that was active in 1957. It also helped Joe Day’s non-governmental organizations. Baking company assistance, which offers the pleasure of a university fund for people in need and in the region. During the First World War, Anderson’s dead Peek died in 1959, two years after he left for a busy job and lived in the middle class.

After the Second World War, the number of companies grew to 31 and includes five restaurants: Lucy Smith (111 East Church), Bon Ton (117), Peek (112) and Roy Smith (116).

Some people remember that coffee-tea flourished in the 1950s right next to Jerry Anderson’s dental practice. Bon-Ton has reached a legendary restoration site.

Just as in depression, the economic recession of the 1950s reduced the purchase of Kirkkokatu’s bonds.

“We were like a family,” said Napoleon Johnson, owner of the Barber Party, reporter in 2000.

Church Street has inspired many young people. Frank Mauld, now 80 years and 12 years, then in 1950, got his first job at Peoples Barbiella in his first black diploma in front of the church. He knew that Thomas Davis, his boss, who had earned his life as a barber, graduated from physics. Julius Covington, who was a dry cleaner, was a graduate of mathematics. Eddie Woolridge and Fred Jackson were also in university education, but were unable to work in their field and entrepreneurs.

“They have always encouraged young people to learn,” recalls Mauldin.

Mauldin visited his first visit last week and enjoyed nostalgia.

“There were no other roads on the road that would have to walk on the street during the weekend, because the sidewalks were so crowded,” Mauldin said. “There was no other place.”

In 1965, three cottages, Red Bird, a trusted cabin and a reserved Bee showed that some visitors returned home. But in Street Street, it began to blur. All hotels are closed and the number of companies decreased to 24. Although black students have found more learning opportunities, Willa Mae Alexander, who signed the Church Street monument since 1944. 1966

In the 1970s, central activity was no longer in black and white. The difference died in the south, as in the village.

With integration and higher car prices, blacks had more opportunities to buy. A group of old empty buildings, sometimes quite ceremonial and indispensable for expensive repairs, was dismantled in 1980 to make parking spots.

At this point, Thompson, elected in the city council in 1976, began to honor the leaders of the church street and lead the spirit of entrepreneurship to the hearts of local people. Four decades ago it has been the driving force of the Church of Trieste Square, a circuit that marks the scene where black curtains are already proud of exposure.

Church Street Heritage Project Director Beth Batson says Thompson’s “unbeatable heart” Heritage Plaza.

“He inspires the project,” Batson said. “He wanted to remember the names of entrepreneurs in the community.”

The square screens of the Restoration Report circulate a six-minute animation and a 70-minute documentary on “Church Street Trading: Pride, Disadvantage, and Parking,” the Orates of Anderson’s 2001 Oral History. affective relations with the village.

Another element of the site (www.churchstreetheriteplaza.com) animation David Donar, professor at Clemson University. It is shown in the gallery Lee Clemson as part of the art program until November 7th. Animation is a small addition to a documentary film depicting the bitter rise and fall of Church Street as a commercial area.

“I am very glad that it happened, I am proud of what we have achieved, even if a year ago,” said Thompson, whose late-husband Harry led the lemon store. East Church Street.

During his first summer course, the visitor offered Thompson to wait: a rational way to talk about models such as Stewart Anderson, W.I. Peek and Edmond Johnson.

“I love to eat and sit on a couch, thinking of time with lots of food and lots of people,” Thompson said. “Now it’s a nice place, quiet and okay.”

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